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We are very excited about our latest giveaway! A big thanks to Warner Bros. Home Entertainment for providing My Hollywood Dream with a copy of The LEGO Movie on Blu-Ray to give to one of our awesome readers! First, lets take a look at the movie’s official description and then check out the “EVERYTHING IS AWESOME” GIF creator in The LEGO Movie App.

The LEGO® Movie, the first-ever, full-length theatrical LEGO® adventure, directed by Phil Lord & Christopher Miller is an original 3D computer animated story that follows Emmet, an ordinary, rules-following, perfectly average LEGO minifigure who is mistakenly identified as the most extraordinary person and the key to saving the world. He is drafted into a fellowship of strangers on an epic quest to stop an evil tyrant, a journey for which Emmet is hopelessly and hilariously underprepared.

Chris Pratt (Moneyball) stars as the voice of Emmet. Will Ferrell (The Campaign) stars as the voice of his primary adversary, President Business, an erudite, anal-retentive CEO who has a hard time balancing world domination with micro-managing his own life; while Liam Neeson (Taken) voices the president’s powerful henchman, known as Bad Cop, who will stop at nothing to catch Emmet.

Starring as Emmet’s fellow travelers are Oscar® winner Morgan Freeman (Million Dollar Baby), as Vitruvius, an old mystic; Elizabeth Banks (The Hunger Games, Emmy nominee for 30 Rock), as tough-as-nails Lucy, who mistakes Emmet for the savior of the world and guides him on his quest; Will Arnett (Emmy nominee, 30 Rock), as the mysterious Batman, a LEGO minifigure with whom Lucy shares a history; Nick Offerman (NBC’s Parks and Recreation) as a craggy, swaggering pirate, obsessed with revenge on President Business; and Alison Brie (Community) as a sweet, loveable member of the team, with a powerful secret.

Keep reading to find out how to win The LEGO Movie on Blu-Ray! Read the rest of this entry »

Release Date: October 5th, 2012
Studio: 20th Century Fox
Director: Olivier Megaton
Cast: Liam Neeson, Famke Janssen, Maggie Grace, and Rade Serbedzija
Plot: Liam Neeson returns as Bryan Mills, the retired CIA agent who stopped at nothing to save his abducted daughter in TAKEN. When he is targeted by a vengeance-seeking crimelord, Bryan must employ his “particular set of skills” to protect his family against an army out to kill them.

Thoughts: When the first Taken came out, I’ll be honest, the trailers hooked me. Liam Neeson uttering “I don’t know who you are. I don’t know what you want…. I have a very particular set of skills…. I will look for you. I will find you. And I will kill you.”  It was that monologue that made the first film an action classic and brought Liam Neeson into a whole new realm of fame. Before Taken, he was best known for Schnidler’s List, but after it he has had a career people kill for.

Only there is something off with the latest trailers for Taken 2, though they are a flashy and beautiful, that same raw feeling, unexpected violence is gone. I suspect this film is going to go the way of The Hangover Part II, wherein the same story is told again but with a slight twist. From what I’ve gathered this film will see a family member of one of the guys killed in film one coming after Bryan Mills (Neeson) and his family for revenge and clearly people are going to be kidnapped and of course people will be killed in Mills’ pursuit to “get his family back.”

Honestly, I’m of the opinion that they should have let this one go and kept Taken as an action gem with no sequel. Unlike the Hangover, where they could have taken it into a new direction but didn’t, it’s hard to see where Taken 2 would go beyond this premise. Revenge. Simple. Sounds appealing but I get the feeling this is going to be the same old, been there before/seen him do that thing. There were early rumors that Maggie Grace, the actress who played the daughter in the first film, would take the hero role but judging from those trailers, that’s likely not going to be the case and that is disappointing. I would have loved to have seen her save her daddy this time and maybe, as a twist, have them team up halfway through the movie to save the mom and other possibly family members (brother? sister? cousin?) as a father and daughter duo. Again, though, that is likely not going to be the case here and again — that’s disappointing.

Will I be seeing this film in theaters? Maybe, if my friends drag me to it. I’ll likely see this on TV or maybe I’ll Netflix or Redbox it down the line. At this point, Taken 2 just does not have the same “must see” factor that the first film had and I’m worried that it is just not as fresh as it could be. My verdict? Wait until the reviews trickle out…

Blah…

A-Team, Movie Poster

Why are all of the A-Team posters so boring? The television show was awesome, the cast of this revamp is great, the trailers have showed some potential. Yet all of the posters for the flick are really bland. What a missed opportunity. At least the film’s Los Angeles premiere was badass (how many times have you seen a Tank drive down Hollywood Blvd?).

Posted on June 4th, 2010 by ThePit | Leave a Comment (2)
Filed Under Entertainment

Star Wars Saga

Yesterday, along with a couple friends, I engaged in the ultimate geek test and watched all six Star Wars films back to back (on a 73 inch HD TV).  We started with the prequels and ended with the special editions of the original trilogy in an effort to watch “George Lucas’ vision” of the series. Or rather, the updated “vision”.

Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace

Sadly, the opening crawl sucks and it sets a bad tone right from the get go. Made before Lucas decided to fully switch to shooting in digital, Menace was shot on film and is stunning. The colors are rich, the sets appear more real and the whole film is simply beautiful. Sadly, that doesn’t save the film from being epically boring.  Menace is a bad film to start a 13 plus hour movie marathon as it sucks the life from the room. The movie is one Senate meeting after another with a lot of political talking, one missed fight that had potential (why didn’t Maul jump on the escaping ship and try to slaughter them all?), a Jedi DNA test (really? seriously? it is just that easy?), and thankfully, it ends with a glimmer of hope for the rest of the series with one of the best on screen duels ever put on film. The acting was sub par all around, except for Liam Neeson’s Qui-Gon Jinn, who is spot on perfect. After filming, Neeson commented on shooting the film by saying “We are basically puppets. I don’t think I can live with the inauthenticity of movies anymore.” And after watching The Phantom Menace again, I agree with him.

Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones

After Menace we can only go up from here, right? Well, we start off with a really good opening crawl that sets the tone perfectly. What follows… I can’t even begin to describe. The film is a mess of a hundred different things happening with no reason at all or even any importance.  The most interesting concept that is brought up is the history of the mysterious Jedi that ordered the clone army to be created. This will have a huge pay off in a later film, right? Lucas wouldn’t introduce a cool concept than just ditch it right? (Spoiler Alert!) It is never mentioned again throughout the whole series. Fail. In fact, after a pretty cool opening sequence, the whole movie just fails.

Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith

Okay, after watching Episode I and II back to back, Revenge of the Sith is awesome (although it is still not a good film). The story is straight forward and the action is intense and fast.  The “reveal” of Palpatine being the Emperor is done in a lackluster throwaway style (after two films of building up to him), and the reason of Anakin Skywalker’s turn to the dark side is goofy and abrupt. He wants to be able to get the power to stop death? Really? That is it. And to do so he is perfectly fine with killing a room full of children. Um… okay.  Portman is underused, but that is probibly a good thing with how bad her romantic scenes with Christensen were in Clones. It is good to see Obi-Wan Kenobi finally become a complete badass. Mace, we barely got to know you. The end fight is good, in fact, all of the fights are pretty good. In the last five minutes Lucas despertly tries to tie the prequels into the later films. He wipes the droids memories (and apparently everyone else just forgets about them), has the last of the Jedi go into hiding, etc. Um, why don’t Yoda, Obi-Wan, and Jimmy Smits try to band together with any other survivors to stop the Empire from growing into what they become in…

Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope

Ah, what a breath of fresh air.  We slow down a bit from the breakneck pacing of Episode III. We find out what the force is again, and hey, it is completely different than how it was described in Episode I.  In fact, every fact we get about the past is completely different than the prequels.You know, watching his original Star Wars would have been a good place for Lucas to start before sitting down to write the prequels. Rewatching A New Hope after the prequels makes me remember how important Han Solo is to the series. The prequels have no one that is anything like him. An outsider (much like ourselves) that is drawn into the conflict and doesn’t believe or care about the nonsense that is the force or the rebellion.  This got me ready for…

Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back

Empire is entertaining from the beginning to the end. It expands upon the first one. Vader steps up from coming off as a hired muscle to being a vicious leader (who only answers to the Emperor). From the release of Empire we should have expected Lucas’ later behavior with changing things around and redoing the series, because the film changes a lot of things that were established in A New Hope.  Yoda’s introduction as crazy old creature stole the show and is absolutely perfect. That sequence alone excels The Empire Strikes Back into being the best Star Wars film.

Star Wars: Episode VI – Return of the Jedi

I HATE HATE HATE the new opening to Return of the Jedi. This was my first exposure to the big lip song and dance number and it is a horrible way to start the film. God, what was Lucas on when he inserted this sequence into the film? Once we get past that, we get a really great closing act to the series. From the moment he steps on screen to the film’s close, this is Luke Skywalker’s movie. He steals and chews through every scene he is in.  I have to ask, after rewatching everything, why in the world do people like Boba Fett? He is a completely useless character that doesn’t even do anything before he meets his end through physical comedy. There are a bunch of logic gaps and plot holes, but overall the film works.  I know this has been said time and again, but having young Anakin’s spirit at the end of the film doesn’t make a lick of sense with having Yoda and Obi-Wan’s spirits being old. He should have replaced everyone, or kept them all old, or as a friend suggested have them morph from old to young, or… you get the picture.

Wow, that was a long day and I have a Star Wars hang over, but it was well worth it. In conclusion, after watching all six Star Wars movies back to back, I have come to the firm realization that they are two completely different film trilogies that don’t fit together at all. Completely different universes that share some similar characters.