We were thrilled to chat with director Jeff Orgill about his independent film, Boppin’ at the Glue Factory.

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Who?
Boppin’ at the Glue Factory, directed by Jeff Orgill, is a satire which incorporates a variety of likeable characters spearheaded by the very talented Henry Dittman and Conrad Roberts. Ditman plays Eric Labudde, an addicted nurse who can get away with anything, and Roberts plays jazz man Tharin Sanders. Together they form an unlikely partnership all in the name of getting high.

This is lead actor Henry Dittman’s first leading role in a feature length motion picture. Conrad Roberts, as jazzman Tharin Sanders, has memorable roles in Mosquito Coast as Mr. Haddy and in Serpent and the Rainbow as Christophe. Mews Small’s, as Mary LeDoux, most recognizable role was as Candy, Jack Nicholson’s partying girlfriend in One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest who deflowers Billy Bibbit.

The story is by Jeff Orgill and Hector Maldonado, with the screenplay by Jeff Orgill and B. Scott O’Malley (of Bleak Future fame). The film is being distributed by Indie Rights (Online) and Passion River Films (DVD).

Boppin At The Glue Factory

What?
Desperate for a place to live and for his next fix, drug-addled nurse Eric LaBudde (Henry Dittman) lands a job in a ramshackle convalescent home, where he develops a mutually enabling relationship with jazz saxophone-playing resident Tharin Sanders (Conrad Roberts). As Eric charms his way into the home’s drug cabinet, he inadvertently brings some light to the retirees’ grim lives.

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Where?
Boppin’ at The Glue Factory takes place in St. Joseph’s Convalescent Home – a grim geriatric care facility. The shooting location was in Norwalk, California at the Metropolitan State Hospital at a decommissioned building that had also been featured in Tim Burton’s Ed Wood.

Boppin at the Glue Factory

When? 
Boppin’ at The Glue Factory finished post-production in 2009 and after an award-winning festival run was released through Prescreen.com, Passion River Films and Indie Rights for online distribution.

Boppin At The Glue Factory

Why?
When director Jeff Orgill discovered his video camera was missing and had been pawned by his junkie friend and roommate he was inspired to explore the relationship between addiction, friendship and co-dependency. Orgill fathomed issues about complicity, enabling behavior, trust and betrayal as he grappled with the personal horror of finding your best friend was not who he appeared to be. By transposing his personal predicament to the world of health care in an old age facility, Orgill was able to get some needed distance from this painful personal story, working in a more social and satirical commentary about a bleak American institution – the “old folks home” AKA “the glue factory.”

Boppin at the Glue Factory

How?
Boppin’ at The Glue Factory is available on VOD and DVD.

Online:

DVD:

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